Last edited by Virg
Saturday, November 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Preliminary study of Chinese ceramics in blue and white (chʻing hua). found in the catalog.

Preliminary study of Chinese ceramics in blue and white (chʻing hua).

Lee, Yu-kuan.

Preliminary study of Chinese ceramics in blue and white (chʻing hua).

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  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Deutsche Gesellschaft nür Natur-und Völkerkunde Ostasiens in Tokyo .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Blue and white ware.,
  • Porcelain, Chinese -- Ming-Qing dynasties, 1368-1912.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    SeriesDeutsche Gesellschaft für Natur-und Völkerkunde Ostasiens Mitteilungen supplement ;, Bd. 31, Mitteilungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Natur- und Völkerkunde Ostasiens ;, Bd. 13.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsNK4399.B58 L44 1971
    The Physical Object
    Pagination38 p.
    Number of Pages38
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5341819M
    LC Control Number72195749

    The collection largely consists of Chinese porcelain and works of art from the Han through to the Qing dynasties, with a particular emphasis on Ming ceramics, Kangxi blue and white porcelain, famille-verte porcelain and famille-rose porcelain. Guest & Gray also deals in antique Japanese porcelain, lacquer, metalwork and ivory.


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Preliminary study of Chinese ceramics in blue and white (chʻing hua). by Lee, Yu-kuan. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Derived from Tang tricolor pottery, blue-on-white pottery and, especially, white porcelain production, raw materials and firing techniques lay the groundwork for the emergence of blue-and-white wares. The invention of Tang blue-and-white porcelain marks a crucial milestone in the developmental history of ancient Chinese by: 1.

This study investigates the origin and development of Tang blue-and-white porcelain. Test samples consist of excavated shards of blue-and-white porcelain, white porcelain, Tang tricolor pottery. OCLC Number: Notes: Spine title also in Chinese characters: Zhongguo qing hua ci qi.

"Published on the occasion of the Exhibition of Chinese Blue-and-White Ceramics by the Southeast Asian Ceramics Society, in conjunction with the National Museum, Singapore, April " English or Chinese.

Description. Chinese blue and white porcelain has made a unique contribution to the history of ceramic technology.

Throughout its development from the beginning of the fourteenth century, through its technical originality and artistic brilliance, it has continued to captivate and inspire the entire s: 6.

Get this from a library. Blue-and-white Chinese porcelain; a study of form. [Cornelius Osgood] -- When an anthropologist writes a monograph on blue-and-white Chinese porcelain, some explanation may be appreciated. This is not because anyone does not know that the primary justification of all. Get this from a library.

Chinese blue and white porcelain. [Duncan Macintosh] Preliminary study of Chinese ceramics in blue and white book To many people "blue and white" is virtually synonymous with the entire range of Chinese porcelain with a large number regarding the ubiquitous "Willow Pattern" as the main, if not the only.

Metrics. Book description. We think of blue and white porcelain as the ultimate global commodity: throughout East and Southeast Asia, the Indian Ocean including the African coasts, the Americas and Europe, consumers desired Chinese porcelains.

Many of these were made in the kilns in and surrounding Jingdezhen. Ceramics history is a mirror of Chinese history. In this chapter we have tried to show the Chinese influence on traditional ceramic's processing, production and innovation.

During the Yuan dynasty (), blue and white porcelain developed in Jingdezhen of Jiangxi province became increasingly popular, earning Jingdezhen the recognition of China’s ceramic metropolis. The cobalt ore used in the blue pigment for Yuan dynasty blue-and-white wares were originally imported from Persia.

of over 2, results for Books: "chinese ceramics" Chinese Ceramics: From the Paleolithic Period through the Qing Dynasty (The Culture & Civilization of China) by Laurie Barnes, Pengbo Ding, et al. | This handsome book is at once a general survey of Chinese ceramics from the early Neolithic period to the present day and an essential reference volume for art historians and connoisseurs.

Originally published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in as an introduction to its vast collection of Chinese ceramics, the book was highly praised by. The six-character Daoguang period mark above belongs to a blue and white stem cup and is written in zhuanshu reading Da Qing Daoguang Nian Zhi, or ‘Made in the Great Qing Dynasty during the reign of the Daoguang Emperor’ ().

Note the characters are much more stylised and angular than kaishu script. Blue and white (qinghua, 青花) porcelain was first mass produced under the Yuan dynasty (–). Baked at a high temperature, porcelain is characterized by the purity of its kaolin clay body.

The Dehua kilns specialised in ceramics with white and cream glazes. In the late Ming dynasty in the 17th century, Dehua wares were creamy in tone, but by the 19th century, these had became more ivory and white. Also during the Ming dynasty, the kilns at Jingdezhen in the south of China produced most of the blue and white ceramics.

In a more recent work (Ma et al., ) the chemical composition of Chinese late Ming export blue-and-white porcelains from Zhangzhou and Jingdezhen kilns, as well as of possible clay sources, is used to establish provenance of Chinese porcelain, especially by using rare earth elements distribution curves.

Undeniably in the late Ming dynasty. Chinese Blue and White Ceramics Hardcover – June 1, by S.T. Yeo (Author), Jean Martin (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ HardcoverReviews: 1.

From the Chenghua () to the Zhengde () periods, the local cobalt yielded a softer, pale blue colour. A pair of blue-and-white ‘ Shou -Character’ dishes.

Qianlong six-character seal marks in underglaze blue and of the period (), 6 in ( cm) diameter. Highly informative book on Chinese ceramics, lots of history in a clear layout, with good pictures.

It's not a gallery, if your love for blue and white ceramics brought you here it does go over it all but it's not a book on that alone, however, it seems like the perfect precursor to looking into the world s: 4. This richly illustrated book traces the history and evolution of blue and white in China, first during the Yuan dynasty (), when the Mongols ruled all of Asia, creating an environment in which blue and white could travel swiftly as far as the Mediterranean.

In the fifteenth century the Chinese became enamoured of their own product, while at the same time the Ming potters were. First published in and now revised in a third edition, a history of blue and white Chinese porcelain which traces its development in socio-historical.

Chinese porcelain has been decorated with a huge variety of motifs in the years since the first recognisable shapes appeared on painted pottery in the Neolithic period. Since the Song dynasty () flowers have been among the most popular decorative themes.

This was particularly true on 18th-century enamelled porcelains. Art collectors and dealers have been pursuing China’s seabed heritage in earnest since earlywhen ab pieces, mainly blue-and-white porcelain.

After the 14th century, most of the hundreds of kiln complexes that had been active in China disappeared. During that time, a single center of production called Jingdezhen (in the southeast province of Jiangxi) emerged, and a new product—porcelain painted with cobalt blue under a transparent glaze—began to dominate the Chinese ceramic industry.

Kangxi six-character mark in underglaze blue. 16⅛ in (41 cm) diam. ‘If you want to collect the imperial pieces, get a book on the marks. Learn them, and look at them on actual porcelains to see how a correct mark looks,’ Gristina advises. One useful reference is Gerald Davidson’s Guide to Marks on Chinese Porcelain, but it.

NC: Ceramics has always had an important place in China and although you've got traditions elsewhere -- in the Middle East, in Europe -- the history in China goes back thousands of years.

Underglaze blue was to become one of the most representative types of decoration for Chinese porcelain, better known as blue-and-white (qinghua, 青花). At the same time, from the standpoint of the shape of the objects, Yuan dynasty porcelains became thick, heavy, and characterized by large size, transforming the refinement of Song dynasty shapes.

Ceramics in Chinese Culture: 10th - 18th Centuries Module Code: 15PARH Credits: 15 FHEQ Level: 7 Year of study: Any Taught in: Term 2. Using the Percival David Collection in the British Museum as primary source material, this course examines the history and development of ceramics in China from the 10th to the 18th century (Song – Qing.

The City of Blue and White: Chinese Porcelain and the Early Modern World Anne Gerritsen. out of 5 stars 6. Hardcover. $ Only 16 left in stock (more on the way). Chinese Ceramics: From the Paleolithic Period through the Qing Dynasty (The Culture & Civilization of China) Laurie s: 7.

Book Review: Blue and White: Chinese Porcelain around the World. Paul D. Buell. International Journal of Maritime History 2, Share. Share. Social Media; Book Review: Blue and White: Chinese Porcelain around the World Show all authors.

Paul D. Buell. Paul D. Buell. Western Washington University Bellingham, WA, USA. "Blue and white pottery" (Chinese: 青花; pinyin: qīng-huā; lit.: 'Blue flowers/patterns') covers a wide range of white pottery and porcelain decorated under the glaze with a blue pigment, generally cobalt decoration is commonly applied by hand, originally by brush painting, but nowadays by stencilling or by transfer-printing, though other methods of application have also been used.

Famed for its delicacy and intricacy, the tradition of ceramic ware and porcelain has been ingrained in the development of Chinese culture. Named after the city it was mainly sourced from, the Chinese art of making pottery ware has been very much envied and admired internationally since.

Chinese ceramics show a continuous development since pre-dynastic times and are one of the most significant forms of Chinese art and ceramics globally. The first pottery was made during the Palaeolithic era.

Chinese ceramics range from construction materials such as bricks and tiles, to hand-built pottery vessels fired in bonfires or kilns, to the sophisticated Chinese porcelain wares made for. This book is intended to provide an up-to-date introduction to the history of Chinese ceramics from prehistory through the eighteenth century.

That there are some differences between East and West in scholarly approach and methodology cannot be denied.

The World in Blue and White. An exhibition of Blue and White ceramics, dating between andfrom members of the Oriental Ceramic Society. Oriental Ceramic Society, London, (co-author and editor) Science and Civilisation in China Vol.5 Part Ceramic Technology. Cambridge University Press, Needham Research Institute, Pottery - Pottery - Song dynasty (– ce): The wares of the Song dynasty are particularly noted for brilliant feldspathic glazes over a stoneware body and their emphasis on simplicity of form.

Decoration is infrequent but may be incised, molded, impressed, or carved; a certain amount of painted decoration was done at Cizhou (present Handan) in Hebei province (see below).

Li Zhiyan is senior research fellow at the National Museum of China and former vice president of the Association of Chinese Ancient ia L. Bower is an adjunct associate professor at the University of the Arts, Li is associate curator of Chinese art, Asian Art Museum of San Ake Sensabaugh is the Ruth and Bruce Dayton Curator of Asian Art at the Yale.

Chinese Art: An Introductory Handbook to Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, Textiles, Bronzes & Minor Arts by Roger Fry, Laurence Binyon, Osvald Siren, Bernard Rackham, A. Kendrick, W. Winkworth and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Fourteenth-Century Blue-And-White: A Group of Chinese Porcelains in the Topkapu Sarayi Muzesi, Istanbul (Occasional Papers, Volume Two, Number One).

Chinese pottery - Chinese pottery - The Five Dynasties (–) and Ten Kingdoms (–): The confused state of northern China under the Five Dynasties was not conducive to development of the pottery industry, and some types, such as the Tang three-colour wares, went out of production completely.

White porcelain and black glazed stonewares, however, continued into the Song dynasty. Buy Chinese Blue and White Porcelain 3rd Revised edition by Macintosh, Duncan (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 5. Aug 9, - Explore Marcos Panlilio's board "CHINESE BLUE AND WHITE PORCELAIN" on Pinterest. See more ideas about blue and white, white porcelain, blue and white china pins. The real story of how porcelain was invented—and then reinvented and reinvented again—is offered up in Edmund de Waal’s new book “The White .The first evidence that this might be the case, Brown said, came in a report by Tom Harrisson, curator of the Sarawak Museum in Borneo, in noting the absence of Chinese blue and white ceramics at 11 archaeological excavations in Borneo in the s.

Harrisson called this omission the "Ming Gap.".